Rugby union's new tackle height laws may be a sign of what's to come for league

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josie andrews
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Rugby union's new tackle height laws may be a sign of what's to come for league

Post by josie andrews »

The changes will be put into practice from July.

The Rugby Football Union Council have unanimously approved the lowering of the tackle height across the community game in England. The changes will come into effect from July 1, 2023.

A reduced tackle height will be introduced across all community rugby levels, with tackles being made at the line of the waist or below. The aim, in the council's view, is to put players’ heads in the safest possible place by defining in law where the line of the tackle may start.

The decision affects all teams below National One with the decision made with player welfare in mind. It is designed to improve player safety with the Council claiming they have the data to support their theory.

It will reduce both head impact exposure and concussion risk in the tackle for both the ball carrier and tackler. They said in a statement: "Evidence from studies has consistently demonstrated that higher contact on the ball carrier and closer proximity of the ball carrier and tacklers’ heads are associated with larger head impacts (as measured by smart mouthguards) and an increased risk of concussion.

"Lowering the height of the tackle and encouraging the tackler to bend more at the waist will minimise the risk of this occurring while maintaining the tackle as an integral part of the game. The RFU Council’s unanimous vote will result in law variations from next season, 2023/24, with the tackle height being set at waist height or below.

Ball carriers will also be encouraged to follow the principle of evasion, which is a mainstay of the game, to avoid late dipping and thereby avoid creating a situation where a bent tackler may be put at increased risk of head-on-head contact with the ball carrier through a late or sudden change in body height of the ball carrier.

"The changes will apply across the community game (clubs, schools, colleges and universities) at both age-grade and adult levels - National One and below in the men’s game and Championship One and below in the women’s game."

The Rugby Football League aren't prepared to comment on the RFU changes at the moment, but with the current legal battle with former players, it could be a case of watch this space.


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the pieman
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Re: Rugby union's new tackle height laws may be a sign of what's to come for league

Post by the pieman »

i was listening to talksport yesterday and a discussion about this

over 200 professional RU players currently suing the RU for head related injury / dementia etc, plus a further 50+ amateur players, so they are taking it seriously

the thing i found most difficult about listening to the discussion was the apparent mis-judging of the situation

they are making the change to protect the tackled player, however, 80%+ of head injuries / concussions come from the tackler. So are they saying that a tackler hitting high up, is getting a whiplash type effect and thus tackling low is going to reduce or eradicate that effect

playing devils advocate, is there still not a risk of hitting the hip, knee etc, and that being far more painful / likely to cause concucssion if the tackle is mis-timed, so there are chances of that increasing.

I know in RU they dont run in with the same force / tackle in the same way that we do in League, but it has changed over the last few years, and there is no doubt contact / force involved, and because the defensive line is set at the back of the ruck (not 10m) there is less time to get speed up for the attacker unless the ball is being spread out wide

so onto RL, implications, probably most definitely, but they may wait for 12-24 months to see how the changes pan out in RU before making radical changes
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Mike
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Re: Rugby union's new tackle height laws may be a sign of what's to come for league

Post by Mike »

I guess they are trying to take some action where they can now even if it doesn't affect all concussions. The future is probably regulations like these together with some sort of soft anti concussion headgear.
widdenoldboy
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Re: Rugby union's new tackle height laws may be a sign of what's to come for league

Post by widdenoldboy »

Its going to take some sorting, even the protective gear brought into NFL has itself led to other injuries.

I think its going to take some sort of mix that the risks are laid out strongly and players sign off on this, along with extensive insurance cover, soft protection and training.
archiekeith
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Re: Rugby union's new tackle height laws may be a sign of what's to come for league

Post by archiekeith »

the pieman wrote: Fri Jan 20, 2023 7:38 am i was listening to talksport yesterday and a discussion about this

over 200 professional RU players currently suing the RU for head related injury / dementia etc, plus a further 50+ amateur players, so they are taking it seriously

the thing i found most difficult about listening to the discussion was the apparent mis-judging of the situation

they are making the change to protect the tackled player, however, 80%+ of head injuries / concussions come from the tackler. So are they saying that a tackler hitting high up, is getting a whiplash type effect and thus tackling low is going to reduce or eradicate that effect

playing devils advocate, is there still not a risk of hitting the hip, knee etc, and that being far more painful / likely to cause concucssion if the tackle is mis-timed, so there are chances of that increasing.

I know in RU they dont run in with the same force / tackle in the same way that we do in League, but it has changed over the last few years, and there is no doubt contact / force involved, and because the defensive line is set at the back of the ruck (not 10m) there is less time to get speed up for the attacker unless the ball is being spread out wide

so onto RL, implications, probably most definitely, but they may wait for 12-24 months to see how the changes pan out in RU before making radical changes
Good point P. Why not remove "and below" thus making attempted tackles waist high only thus protecting a tackler also emphasis on "dodging " rather than dodging and dipping
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Re: Rugby union's new tackle height laws may be a sign of what's to come for league

Post by josie andrews »

Rugby League in unison after 15-man code's concussion law sparks heavy debate

Plenty of people involved in Rugby League have taken to social media to disagree about the new changes made by the RFU.

Current and former Rugby League players have taken to social media to question the changes happening to Rugby Union this year.

The outburst comes days after the Rugby Football Union Council unanimously approved the lowering of the tackle height across the community game in England. Changes that will come into effect from July 1, 2023. Announcing that the rules will be introduced across all community rugby levels, with tackles only being made at the line of the waist or below, people involved in the 13-man code are worried the RFL may follow suit.

Paul Cooke, who played both codes during his time as a player, posted, "Rugby is brutal. League and union. Concussion is guaranteed. Make players sign a disclosure form to accept that he/she could be damaged in later life. I don't think there's a player I've met that wouldn't sign it and take the chance of long-term damage to live their dream."

Current Batley Bulldogs coach Craig Lingard also posted a tongue-in-cheek spite at the 15-man code, saying, "Rugby Union doing their bit to increase participation in Rugby League today I see." with Huddersfield Giants Legend Eorl Crabtree backing him up with this statement. "Genuine question RFU... On your own try line, an attacking player goes low attempting to score a try. How do you stop this with the new ruling?"

Castleford Tigers star and former Leeds Rhinos forward Alex Mellor quoted the RFU's Twitter announcement, simply posting, "Waist or below wow", followed by several laugh emojis. It's not just the players and coaches in shock, with former leading Super League official Richard Silverwood desperately hoping the 13-man code don't follow suit.

This ruling by the RFU I hope doesn't come into RL. Have they not thought about the possibility of more head clashes if 2 players are both tackling low? 1 low, 1 higher works so why change? Deal with head tackles more harshly, not change the whole game." Silverwood tweeted.

The Rugby Football League haven't yet commented on the RFU changes at the moment. However, with the ongoing legal dispute between ex-players happening, plus more awareness and scientific evidence coming out about post-playing concussion effects, more is certainly to come on the issue.

https://www.examinerlive.co.uk/sport/ru ... dium=email
Anyone can support a team when it is winning, that takes no courage.
But to stand behind a team, to defend a team when it is down and really needs you,
that takes a lot of courage. #18thMan
josie andrews
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Re: Rugby union's new tackle height laws may be a sign of what's to come for league

Post by josie andrews »

It will be the end of either code if this goes through & the RFL follow suit! You may as well play touch rugby!
Anyone can support a team when it is winning, that takes no courage.
But to stand behind a team, to defend a team when it is down and really needs you,
that takes a lot of courage. #18thMan
archiekeith
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Re: Rugby union's new tackle height laws may be a sign of what's to come for league

Post by archiekeith »

josie andrews wrote: Sun Jan 22, 2023 8:57 pm It will be the end of either code if this goes through & the RFL follow suit! You may as well play touch rugby!
I think you could be right josie. It seems their are two horns to this bull so to speak both leading to an antimony. Eradicate possibility of serious brain problems in later life or leave things as they are and take the risk and everything that goes with it Not a situation the RFU/RL find themselves in a massive paradox.
archiekeith
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Re: Rugby union's new tackle height laws may be a sign of what's to come for league

Post by archiekeith »

archiekeith wrote: Mon Jan 23, 2023 9:16 am
josie andrews wrote: Sun Jan 22, 2023 8:57 pm It will be the end of either code if this goes through & the RFL follow suit! You may as well play touch rugby!
I think you could be right josie. It seems their are two horns to this bull so to speak both leading to an antimony. Eradicate possibility of serious brain problems in later life or leave things as they are and take the risk and everything that goes with it Not a situation the RFU/RL find themselves in a massive paradox.
Read antinomy for antimony Sorry
keptinthedarkfans
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Re: Rugby union's new tackle height laws may be a sign of what's to come for league

Post by keptinthedarkfans »

josie andrews wrote: Sun Jan 22, 2023 8:54 pm Rugby League in unison after 15-man code's concussion law sparks heavy debate

Plenty of people involved in Rugby League have taken to social media to disagree about the new changes made by the RFU.

Current and former Rugby League players have taken to social media to question the changes happening to Rugby Union this year.

The outburst comes days after the Rugby Football Union Council unanimously approved the lowering of the tackle height across the community game in England. Changes that will come into effect from July 1, 2023. Announcing that the rules will be introduced across all community rugby levels, with tackles only being made at the line of the waist or below, people involved in the 13-man code are worried the RFL may follow suit.

Paul Cooke, who played both codes during his time as a player, posted, "Rugby is brutal. League and union. Concussion is guaranteed. Make players sign a disclosure form to accept that he/she could be damaged in later life. I don't think there's a player I've met that wouldn't sign it and take the chance of long-term damage to live their dream."

Current Batley Bulldogs coach Craig Lingard also posted a tongue-in-cheek spite at the 15-man code, saying, "Rugby Union doing their bit to increase participation in Rugby League today I see." with Huddersfield Giants Legend Eorl Crabtree backing him up with this statement. "Genuine question RFU... On your own try line, an attacking player goes low attempting to score a try. How do you stop this with the new ruling?"

Castleford Tigers star and former Leeds Rhinos forward Alex Mellor quoted the RFU's Twitter announcement, simply posting, "Waist or below wow", followed by several laugh emojis. It's not just the players and coaches in shock, with former leading Super League official Richard Silverwood desperately hoping the 13-man code don't follow suit.

This ruling by the RFU I hope doesn't come into RL. Have they not thought about the possibility of more head clashes if 2 players are both tackling low? 1 low, 1 higher works so why change? Deal with head tackles more harshly, not change the whole game." Silverwood tweeted.

The Rugby Football League haven't yet commented on the RFU changes at the moment. However, with the ongoing legal dispute between ex-players happening, plus more awareness and scientific evidence coming out about post-playing concussion effects, more is certainly to come on the issue.

https://www.examinerlive.co.uk/sport/ru ... dium=email
I think Paul Cooke has it right. Signing a disclaimer is a way without killing off the game. To be brutally honest there's plenty of occupations in life with far greater risks with much less rewards . In many cases there only form of income open to them. I also agree that given the choice of being able to live there dream. Very few people would turn it down. I Know given the chance I would have signed it in a heartbeat.
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